ADVAITA SAMKHYA
Holographic Principles

Recurring Strings

[Fractal Tree]
Figure 28: The Fractal Tree

The Fractal Universe

Fractals are geometrical objects in which the parts reflect the whole.  They’re produced by recursion.  In string theory (gunavada) [1], the seventy principles (saptatitattva) similarly reflect the ten strings (dashaguna).  Each of the seven strings (saptaguna) being the recursive origin (punaravartin mula) of a tenfold principle (dashatattva). [2]  Therefore, the universe (jagat) is like a multidimensional fractal.

Pattern of Recursion

Many of the seventy principles are neither named nor discussed.  This is because they are repetitions of the strings (gunas).  Hence, the pattern of recursion is emphasized instead.  The pattern being 0 → 3 → 7 → repeat.  This is summarized by the Hermetic axiom, “As above, so below.[3]  The strings being the “above” and the principles being the “below.”  So, one who knows the strings, knows the principles.

The Unmanifest Principles

  A: Kosha B: Sharira C: Yoga
4 sanmayakosha karanasharira samadhiyoga
5 anandamayakosha devasharira dhyanayoga
6 chinmayakosha chittasharira dharanayoga
7 vijnanamayakosha ahamsharira rajayoga
8 manomayakosha namasharira jnanayoga
9 kamamayakosha lingasharira bhaktiyoga
10 pranamayakosha sthulasharira karmayoga
Table 5: Twenty-One Unmanifest Principles

Seven Triads

The three strings (triguna) [4] don’t have principles (tattvas).  So, the rows in the chart above represent the seven strings (saptaguna) [5].  The fourth being existence (sat), and the tenth being physics (tamas).  Each tenfold principle (dashatattva) contains a threefold principle (tritattva) [6].  Each of which consists of a spiritual sheath (paurusha kosha) and a material body (prakrita sharira) united (samyukta) by an oversoul union (aishvara yoga). [7]  This yields twenty-one unmanifest principles (avyakta tattvas).

The Seven Sheaths

Advaita Samkhya considers the five classical sheaths (panchakosha) [8] to be sevenfold.  These seven sheaths (saptakosha) are spiritual (paurusha), as opposed to the material bodies (prakrita shariras).

  1. Sanmayakosha [9] is the existence sheath.
  2. Anandamayakosha [10] is the classical bliss sheath.
  3. Chinmayakosha [11] is the consciousness sheath.
  4. Vijnanamayakosha [12] is the classical intellectual sheath.  It’s synonymous with “buddhi” and “mahat.”
  5. Manomayakosha [13] is the classical mental sheath.
  6. Kamamayakosha [14] is the love sheath.  It’s pure desire, disctinct from attachment (raga).
  7. Pranamayakosha [15] is the classical energy sheath.  It’s synonymous with the classical food sheath (annamayakosha).

The Seven Bodies

Advaita Samkhya similarly considers the three classical bodies (sharira traya) [16] to be sevenfold.  These seven bodies (sharira saptaka) are material (prakrita), as opposed to the spiritual sheaths (paurusha kosha). 

  1. Karanasharira [9] is the classical causal body.  It’s the “light of a thousand suns” (bha of surya-sahasra) [17].
  2. Devasharira [10] is the divine body.  It’s divine will (devachitta).
  3. Chittasharira [11] is the conscious body.  In Dvaita Samkhya, the term “chitta” is the composite of intellect, ego, and mind (buddhi, ahamkara, and manas). [18]  But in Advaita Samkhya, it’s the storehouse of conscious impressions (chetana samskaras).
  4. Ahamsharira [12] is the ego body.  It’s synonymous with “ahamkara,” not to be confused with egoism (asmita).
  5. Namasharira [13] is the name body.  It’s the storehouse of subconscious impressions (jada samskaras).
  6. Lingasharira [14] is the classical subtle body.
  7. Sthulasharira [15] is the classical gross body.

The Seven Yogas

Finally, Advaita Samkhya also considers the three classical yogas (yoga traya) [19] to be sevenfold.  Each of these seven yogas (yoga saptaka) is the union (samyoga) of a spiritual sheath (paurusha kosha) with its correpsonding material body (prakrita sharira).  They aren’t discrete practices (sadhanas), though.  Rather, they are principles (tattvas) to be fulfilled through practice (sadhya through sadhana). [20]  Hence, they can be approached uniquely by different individuals, religions, or cultures.

  1. Absorption yoga (samadhiyoga) [9] is the union of the existence sheath and the causal body.
  2. Meditation yoga (dhyanayoga) [10] is the union of the bliss sheath and the divine body.
  3. Concentration yoga (dharanayoga) [11] is the union of the consciousness sheath and the conscious body.
  4. Royal yoga (rajayoga) [12] is the union of the intellectual sheath and the ego body.
  5. Knowledge yoga (jnanayoga) [13] is the union of the mental sheath and the name body.  This is the knowledge that belongs to the mind.
  6. Devotion yoga (bhaktiyoga) [14] is the union of the love sheath and the subtle body.
  7. Action yoga (karmayoga) [15] is the union of the energy sheath and the gross body.

The Manifest Principles

  D E F G H I J
4 - - - - - - -
5 - - - - - - -
6 - - - - - - -
7 - - - - - - -
8 - - shrotra/
vach
chakshus/
pada
tvach/
pani
jihva/
upastha
ghrana/
payu
9 - - shabda rupa sparsha rasa gandha
10 - - akasha agni vayu jala prithvi
Table 6: Forty-Nine Manifest Principles

Seven Heptads

The chart above is the continuation of the previous chart.  In addition to a threefold principle (tritattva), each tenfold principle (dashatattva) also contains a sevenfold principle (saptatattva). [6]  This yields forty-nine manifest principles (vyakta tattva).  Of these heptads, only the senses [22], subtle elements [23], and gross elements [24] (indriyas, tanmatras, and mahabhutas) are named.

The Mental Senses

The senses belong to the eighth string, mind (sattva). [21]  Each sense is a unified pair consisting of a knowledge sense (jnanendriya) and an action sense (karmendriya).  Advaita Samkhya considers them sevenfold, with the first two being unnamed.

  1. [unnamed]
  2. [unnamed]
  3. Shrotra/vach is hearing/speaking.
  4. Chakshus/pada is seeing/moving.
  5. Tvach/pani is feeling/grasping.
  6. Jihva/upastha is tasting/reproducing.
  7. Ghrana/payu is smelling/eliminating.

The Emotional Subtle Elements

The subtle elements belong to the ninth string, emotion (rajas). [22]  They are the subtle objects of the senses.  Advaita Samkhya considers them sevenfold, with the first two being unnamed.

  1. [unnamed]
  2. [unnamed]
  3. Shabda is sound.
  4. Rupa is appearance, which includes shape and color.
  5. Sparsha is feel.
  6. Rasa is flavor.
  7. Gandha is odor.

The Physical Gross Elements

The gross elements belong to the tenth string, physics (tamas). [23]  They are the gross objects of the senses.  Advaita Samkhya considers them sevenfold, with the first two being unnamed.

  1. [unnamed]
  2. [unnamed]
  3. Akasha is ether.
  4. Agni is fire.
  5. Vayu is air.
  6. Jala is water.
  7. Prithvi is earth.

Symmetry

[Abacus]
Figure 29: Similar Principles

An interesting feature of fractals is their self-similarity, or expanding symmetry.  In Advaita Samkhya, the basis of symmetry (prama of samamiti) is numerical frequency of vibration (samkhya avritti of spanda). [24]  These frequencies are represented by the numbers one through ten.  Thus, different things may be inwardly related to each other without having the same outward appearance.  This allows for the diversity of the universe (jagat) while maintaining its underlying unity.

Resonance

[Singing Bowls]
Figure 30: Singing Bowls

Symmetry (samamiti) produces resonance (anunada), which allows information exchange (samvedana). [25]  This means that numerically similar principles (tattvas) resonate with each other despite being in different states (avasthas).  This is how the senses (indriyas) [21] interact with the subtle elements (tanmatras) [22] and gross elements (mahabhutas) [23].  Resonance can be thought of in terms of waves.  For instance, hearing/speech (shrotra/vach), sound (shabda), and ether (akasha) are all on similar wavelengths.

References

  1. Vyas, S. K. Advaita Samkhya Sutras 4.1.
  2. Vyas, S. K. Advaita Samkhya Sutras 5.1.
  3. Trismegistus, H. The Emerald Tablet.
  4. Vyas, S. K. Advaita Samkhya Sutras 4.10.
  5. Vyas, S. K. Advaita Samkhya Sutras 4.12.
  6. Vyas, S. K. Advaita Samkhya Sutras 5.2.
  7. Vyas, S. K. Advaita Samkhya Sutras 5.3.
  8. Adi Shankaracharya. Tattva Bodha 3.
  9. Vyas, S. K. Advaita Samkhya Sutras 5.4.
  10. Vyas, S. K. Advaita Samkhya Sutras 5.5.
  11. Vyas, S. K. Advaita Samkhya Sutras 5.6.
  12. Vyas, S. K. Advaita Samkhya Sutras 5.7.
  13. Vyas, S. K. Advaita Samkhya Sutras 5.8.
  14. Vyas, S. K. Advaita Samkhya Sutras 5.9.
  15. Vyas, S. K. Advaita Samkhya Sutras 5.10.
  16. Adi Shankaracharya. Tattva Bodha 2.1.
  17. Vyasa. Bhagavad Gita 11.12.
  18. Flood, G. D., 1996. An Introduction to Hinduism. p. 235. New York: Cambridge University Press.
  19. Flood, G. D., 1996. An Introduction to Hinduism. p. 96. New York: Cambridge University Press.
  20. Vyas, S. K. Advaita Samkhya Sutras 5.11.
  21. Vyas, S. K. Advaita Samkhya Sutras 5.12.
  22. Vyas, S. K. Advaita Samkhya Sutras 5.13.
  23. Vyas, S. K. Advaita Samkhya Sutras 5.14.
  24. Vyas, S. K. Advaita Samkhya Sutras 5.15.
  25. Vyas, S. K. Advaita Samkhya Sutras 5.16.